Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

It’s the End of the World as We Know It

Earlier this year the Games Research Network asked if I could write a brief blog post introducing my research. Cue various conferences, college projects, impending deadlines, a series of viral infections and a fair amount of procrastination, and we’re finally here, my first ever blog post.

Before you a city lies in ruins. Buildings burn whilst flaming meteors fall from the heavens. Gathered on a roof-top, viewing the devastation, our heroes are addressed by their leader… read more

MIGRATIONS LARP AND THE VALUE OF PLAY

After our run at The Smoke in January, earlier this summer Dr Chloe Buckley and myself ran a small LARP workshop as part of the Manchester Gothic Festival, during the International Gothic Association Conference. This game was open to the public and offered participants the opportunity to experience a gothic-style narrative from the inside, as characters. Inspired by the world of HP Lovecraft’s novels and its surrounding mythos, Migrations aimed to introduce participants to the feeling of being trapped and suddenly ignorant of the basic rules of the world – a common enough experience for characters in Gothic novels. read more

CFP: ‘Analog Games and Translation’ (Analog Game Studies)

Special Issue of Analog Game Studies: ‘Analog Games and Translation’

Guest Editor: Jonathan Evans, University of Portsmouth, UK

Call for Papers

This special issue will analyse translation in and of modern analog games, including board games, card games, tabletop role-playing games (RPGs) and live action role-playing games (LARPs). Recent decades have seen the expansion of the hobby of gaming around the world and gaming is now more multinational and multilingual than ever. read more

Book Review: A Play of Bodies: How We Perceive Videogames

A Play of Bodies: How We Perceive Videogames

By Brendan Keogh

MIT Press, 2018. ISBN 9780262037631

The cult comedy videogames site Old Man Murray developed an innovative and completely objective ‘time to crate’ review system, whereby games would be assessed on the amount of time elapsed between the start of the game and the first crate that the player sees. Often (in the late 1990s and early 2000s) this would be a matter of seconds, leading to some incredibly low scoring reviews. I sometimes feel that a similar system might be required for games studies books; often you can go into a title knowing that it’s going to mention Rez, Proteus, and the Psycho Mantis fight from Metal Gear Solid. It’s just a matter of when rather than if. When I flicked through Brendan Keogh’s new book A Play of Bodies: How We Perceive Videogames (2018) and saw these titles mentioned again, I got a horrible feeling of déjà vu; however, the approach that Keogh takes to even the most ubiquitously discussed games is so refreshing that I quickly abandoned any preconceptions as to where the book would take me. read more

Book Review: Role-Playing Game Studies: Transmedia Foundations

Role-Playing Game Studies: Transmedia Foundations

Edited by Sebastian Deterding and José Zagal

Routledge, 2018. ISBN:9780815369202

Originally conceived during discussions amongst the Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA) Role-Playing Studies Special Interest Group, this impressive volume represents an essential collection of essays and perspectives for any scholar currently researching, or thinking about researching, Role Playing Games (RPGs). With contributors ranging from internationally renowned academics (e.g. Staffan Björk and Sarah Lynne Bowman) to games designers (Moyra Turkington) and experts in narrative design (Whitney Beltrán), this compendium presents a multifaceted and holistic approach to the consideration of the subject. read more

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