Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

Tag: Video Games (page 1 of 3)

CFP: Gaming the Gothic

When I was a little kid, I was obsessed with the spooky elements in digital gaming. My favourite Super Mario levels where the Ghost House stages, Zombies Ate My Neighbors was like looking into a more honest mirror, and once Resident Evil came out I was never the same. Now that I’m an adult, I am working on a PhD in Spooky Gaming. (Technically the Ludology of the Gothic, but who’s counting?) Which is why I was beyond happy when Gaming the Gothic reached out to me to be on their organizing committee. read more

Event: Games for the Many

Have you ever wondered if games can effect political change?

They can.

Games for the Many is a new political games studio and community of political game makers exploring how to make political impact with play, developing games as digital campaigning tools. We believe games can change the world, for the many, not the few. read more

The psychology of gaming: Are we still talking about gender?

There is an assumption that if I say I’m a gamer, we’re talking mobile game Candy Crush, not retro classic Super Metroid (which is not as easy as speed-runners make it look). Women who are brave enough to identify as gamers are often exposed to hostile online gaming environments and are subject to a lot of gatekeeping. There is still the feeling that men decide who ‘gets’ to be a gamer and what a ‘real gamer’ looks like. read more

Are Video Games a Waste of Time?

One of the members of the Games Research Network, Tom Brock, was recently interviewed by the BBC World Service for their flagship investigative program ‘The Inquiry.’ You can check it out here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3csv1bv

Tom appears at about 17:30 in, where he extols the wonders of Dark Souls, compares video gamers to piano players, discusses the useful skills that are developed by gamers, and reveals the joys of “punishing himself with puzzles.” read more

Deconstructing the Monolith: The subjective Experience of avatar use in gamers

A group of Researchers from the MMU Department of Psychology are recruiting participants for an interview study looking at the way gamers interact with video game avatars that resemble themselves.

Digital self-representations entered the mainstream with the release of the Wii in 2006. Consumers were able to quickly create quirky avatars that resembled them and then use these as in game characters. The success of this feature prompted many other developers to include digital self-representations in their products. read more

Older posts