Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

Tag: Video Games (page 1 of 3)

It’s the End of the World as We Know It

Earlier this year the Games Research Network asked if I could write a brief blog post introducing my research. Cue various conferences, college projects, impending deadlines, a series of viral infections and a fair amount of procrastination, and we’re finally here, my first ever blog post.

Before you a city lies in ruins. Buildings burn whilst flaming meteors fall from the heavens. Gathered on a roof-top, viewing the devastation, our heroes are addressed by their leader… read more

A Half-baked Cake: Idealised Avatars In An Exergame

The Avatar

In August of last year I wrote a blog advertising my interview study on experiences of play an exercise game with an avatar that looks similar to the player.

Last week I presented some of my findings at a Games Research Network seminar and thought I would summarise the talk in this short blog post

I started the talk by defining the term avatar which has only recently received a thorough explication by Nowak and Fox (2018). In short, it is the representation of a person in digital space. This is not restricted to visual representations, but can be text, sound, and in some cases haptic. For my purposes, I am looking at avatars that specifically look like a person, and in particular, videogame characters. read more

#girlsbehindgames

March 8th is International Women’s Day (or, as it is known in some areas of the internet, “but when is it international mens [sic] day”?) and it offers a perfect opportunity to think about how to celebrate and make visible the contribution women make to game design and development.

The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is #PressforProgress – a call to “motivate and unite friends, colleagues and whole communities to think, act and be gender inclusive.” One hundred years after women gained the right to vote in the UK, there are – depressingly – too many areas of politics, society and economics where progress is sorely needed or, else, occurring at a sluggish pace. read more

EGU Games Day

The use of narrative is well known as an effective technique for communication. We are fundamentally set-up to respond to stories, and where we might not respond to simple statement of facts, we are more likely to respond to something which moves us emotionally. I see games as an extension of this, and a form of story-telling where the narrative itself is not pre-determined. This is what makes games so fun, so exciting, and so powerful. read more

CFP: Gaming the Gothic

When I was a little kid, I was obsessed with the spooky elements in digital gaming. My favourite Super Mario levels where the Ghost House stages, Zombies Ate My Neighbors was like looking into a more honest mirror, and once Resident Evil came out I was never the same. Now that I’m an adult, I am working on a PhD in Spooky Gaming. (Technically the Ludology of the Gothic, but who’s counting?) Which is why I was beyond happy when Gaming the Gothic reached out to me to be on their organizing committee. read more

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