Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

Tag: Gaming (page 1 of 4)

Book Review – Tabletop Gaming Manual

Tabletop Gaming Manual
Matt Thrower
Haynes Manuals, 2018
ISBN: 1785211498

This new book from games journalist Matt Thrower is published by Haynes Publishing, who are perhaps best known for their car, motorcycle, scooter and ATV manuals, and who in recent years have developed an interesting and lucrative sideline in General Interest Manuals, with topics ranging from Zombie Survival to the Imperial Death Star. With such a wide range of fan culture on offer, it was surely only a matter of times before tabletop games got the Haynes treatment, and in Matt Thrower (who as well as his excellent Fortress blog is perhaps best known for his work with Shut up and Sit Down) they have the ideal gamer for the job. read more

Another Meetup board games group is starting… with a twist

There are many Meetup groups for adults interested in board games but those joining the new (and only) Chester group launching next week by staff at the Storyhouse may find a common theme connecting the games – science! This group has been started with support from the Games Research Network, following a day of training organised by the Institute of Physics for non-scientist community group leaders interested in the possibility of using games with their audiences to raise science capital, a concept used to understand why some people don’t believe science is something they should or can be part of. read more

Event: Games for the Many

Have you ever wondered if games can effect political change?

They can.

Games for the Many is a new political games studio and community of political game makers exploring how to make political impact with play, developing games as digital campaigning tools. We believe games can change the world, for the many, not the few. read more

Call for Papers: Playing Dead

Playing Dead, University of York (17/05/2018)  

It is the aim of this one-day symposium to explore the intersections that exist between death, culture and play. Play is used in a board sense to mean leisure activities more generally and, as such, not only encapsulates the playing of (non-)digital games, but also the consumption of cinema, literature, comics, etc. Alongside a keynote address from Professor Christopher Partridge (Lancaster University) abstracts are sought from individuals wishing to present a twenty-minute paper. Abstracts are due by no later than 28 February 2018. read more

What is LARP?

On Wednesday 13th December, we will be running a horror-themed LARP for members of the Games Research Network at MMU. LARP stands for “live action role play”, and may be sometimes called LRP or “live gaming”. LARP was once the subject of derisive mockery in mainstream culture – the 2008 movie, Role Models, provides one particularly excruciating example. However, with the rise of broader “geek culture” to the mainstream, LARP in the UK is becoming more visible and more popular (see this recent article on “The Art of LARP”). Elements of LARP (costume, staged dramatic scenes, live character interaction) are increasingly incorporated into theatrical events and tourist attractions, such as the zombie walk, ghost tours and immersive theatre experiences. read more

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