Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

Tag: games design (page 1 of 2)

New Catan Scenario

Followers of the Games Research Network will be aware that we have been working on an (unofficial) expansion for Klaus Teuber’s seminal tabletop game Catan®. The scenario aims to develop dialogue around global warming, and it is now available for download.

Follow this link to download the game read more

Desk Job

Members from the Games Research Network recently collaborated to create a game for the No Shit Sherlock Games Jam.

After an initial planning session, we got together to hammer out the details of the game, and in an 8-hour session on Friday 9th March 2018, we created Desk Job.

Desk Job is a Detective Game that involves you trying to solve a cold case whilst putting up with the demands of your overbearing boss. It can be played either solo or as a group and should last the best part of an afternoon or evening. All you need is a printer and some scissors! read more

EGU Games Day

The use of narrative is well known as an effective technique for communication. We are fundamentally set-up to respond to stories, and where we might not respond to simple statement of facts, we are more likely to respond to something which moves us emotionally. I see games as an extension of this, and a form of story-telling where the narrative itself is not pre-determined. This is what makes games so fun, so exciting, and so powerful. read more

Event: Games for the Many

Have you ever wondered if games can effect political change?

They can.

Games for the Many is a new political games studio and community of political game makers exploring how to make political impact with play, developing games as digital campaigning tools. We believe games can change the world, for the many, not the few. read more

How to Fail Your Research Degree

Daisy Abbot, Research Developer in the School of Simulation and Visualisation at the Glasgow School of Art tells us about a game that she has been developing which teaches research skills, and which is also fun to play.

In 2014 I took over a course teaching postgraduate research skills from a departing colleague. As my students and I worked our way through 12 weeks of Powerpoints, I experienced for myself the acknowledged difficulty of teaching research skills in a way that is both meaningful and motivating to students [1]. This issue is exacerbated by students’ transition to a postgraduate context [2], making courses on research skills all the more important to get right. Immediately after this first semester, I began developing an educational game as a teaching tool to complement my course. The game would likely only be played once during the course and therefore had to be high-impact and memorable; it had to be obviously relevant to students; and (unlike a 2 hour lecture on literature reviews) it had to be fun! read more

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