Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

Tag: analogue (page 1 of 2)

Inspiring Through Games

The work of three Games Research Network members was recently published in the April edition of Physics World and today online. The training, delivered by Sam Illingworth and Paul Wake, and coordinated by Hannah Renshall from the Institute of Physics, aimed to empower non-scientist community leaders already working with audiences under-represented in physics to engage them with aspirational STEM activities. read more

#girlsbehindgames

March 8th is International Women’s Day (or, as it is known in some areas of the internet, “but when is it international mens [sic] day”?) and it offers a perfect opportunity to think about how to celebrate and make visible the contribution women make to game design and development.

The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is #PressforProgress – a call to “motivate and unite friends, colleagues and whole communities to think, act and be gender inclusive.” One hundred years after women gained the right to vote in the UK, there are – depressingly – too many areas of politics, society and economics where progress is sorely needed or, else, occurring at a sluggish pace. read more

Tabletop Chemistry

The GRN is delighted to report that it was successful in its application to the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Outreach Fund.

Teaming up with our friends and colleagues at Errant Science, we will be developing a set of learning materials that can be used alongside off-the-shelf tabletop games to develop dialogue around chemistry.  We’re also working alongside librarians to create a series of activities during International Games Week in order to bring games and chemistry to a wider audience. read more

EGU Games Day

The use of narrative is well known as an effective technique for communication. We are fundamentally set-up to respond to stories, and where we might not respond to simple statement of facts, we are more likely to respond to something which moves us emotionally. I see games as an extension of this, and a form of story-telling where the narrative itself is not pre-determined. This is what makes games so fun, so exciting, and so powerful. read more

Another Meetup board games group is starting… with a twist

There are many Meetup groups for adults interested in board games but those joining the new (and only) Chester group launching next week by staff at the Storyhouse may find a common theme connecting the games – science! This group has been started with support from the Games Research Network, following a day of training organised by the Institute of Physics for non-scientist community group leaders interested in the possibility of using games with their audiences to raise science capital, a concept used to understand why some people don’t believe science is something they should or can be part of. read more

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