Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

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Call for Papers: Playful Learning 2018

Playful Learning is looking for submissions in all areas relating to playful learning in adult education including – but not limited to – higher and further education, playful workplaces, and lifelong learning.

Playful Learning is pitched at the intersection of learning and play for adults. Playful in approach and outlook, yet underpinned by robust research and working practices, we provide a space where teachers, researchers and students can play, learn and think together. A space to meet other playful people and be inspired by talks, workshops, activities and events. Based in the heart of Manchester, we also explore some of the city’s playful spaces with evening activities continuing the fun and conversations after the formal programme ends. read more

Event: Games for the Many

Have you ever wondered if games can effect political change?

They can.

Games for the Many is a new political games studio and community of political game makers exploring how to make political impact with play, developing games as digital campaigning tools. We believe games can change the world, for the many, not the few. read more

Event: Northwest Postgraduate Games Research Networking

Wednesday, 21 Feb 2018, 13:30 -16:00

MMU Union, Meeting Room 8

The Games Research Network is excited to be hosting its first meeting for postgraduates researching games and play.

This event is intended to lay the foundation for a network of postgraduate students and post-docs from across disciplines, who are working on (or have an interest in) digital games, board/tabletop games, and play. We’re inviting researchers from universities in the north-west of England and beyond to take part. read more

Event: Dr Mark Johnson – The Importance of Gambling to Game Studies

Wednesday, 14 Feb 2018
, 14:30-16:00.

Geoffrey Manton Building, GM307.

This talk will explore a number of potential intersections between game studies and gambling studies, focusing on how both disciplines can yield a wide range of insight into the domains studied by the other, yet have remained almost entirely separate up to the present day. Game studies has been almost universally uninterested in exploring games in which gambling takes place – casino games, card games, many online games – due concerns over the ethical weight the word “gambling” carries, a dominant focus on video games and to a lesser extent board games, and the central roles of scholars from humanities and social science rather than psychology and other positivistic disciplines which dominate gambling studies. Gambling studies, meanwhile, emphasises questions of problem and responsible gambling which leave little room for critical studies, has only just begun to address the importance of understanding video games to contemporary gambling practice, and can often view any form of gameplay as the first step towards pathology, deviance, and negative life outcomes. read more

Gaming at the Smoke – Designing a Horror LARP

This weekend we attended The Smoke, an international LARP festival in London, now in its second year. We were there to test the design of a horror LARP we have developed for people who have not experienced LARP before, and in the process encountered a range of LARP communities and types new to us both. Attendees at the Smoke had begun to refer to these as “LARP islands” and it seems that each has its own dialect and practices of LARP. read more

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