Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

Category: Game Context (page 1 of 2)

These are posts that are related to the context of the games that are played by the Network, and which set the scene for how they fit into e.g. wider research questions.

Desk Job

Members from the Games Research Network recently collaborated to create a game for the No Shit Sherlock Games Jam.

After an initial planning session, we got together to hammer out the details of the game, and in an 8-hour session on Friday 9th March 2018, we created Desk Job.

Desk Job is a Detective Game that involves you trying to solve a cold case whilst putting up with the demands of your overbearing boss. It can be played either solo or as a group and should last the best part of an afternoon or evening. All you need is a printer and some scissors! read more

#girlsbehindgames

March 8th is International Women’s Day (or, as it is known in some areas of the internet, “but when is it international mens [sic] day”?) and it offers a perfect opportunity to think about how to celebrate and make visible the contribution women make to game design and development.

The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is #PressforProgress – a call to “motivate and unite friends, colleagues and whole communities to think, act and be gender inclusive.” One hundred years after women gained the right to vote in the UK, there are – depressingly – too many areas of politics, society and economics where progress is sorely needed or, else, occurring at a sluggish pace. read more

How to Fail Your Research Degree

Daisy Abbot, Research Developer in the School of Simulation and Visualisation at the Glasgow School of Art tells us about a game that she has been developing which teaches research skills, and which is also fun to play.

In 2014 I took over a course teaching postgraduate research skills from a departing colleague. As my students and I worked our way through 12 weeks of Powerpoints, I experienced for myself the acknowledged difficulty of teaching research skills in a way that is both meaningful and motivating to students [1]. This issue is exacerbated by students’ transition to a postgraduate context [2], making courses on research skills all the more important to get right. Immediately after this first semester, I began developing an educational game as a teaching tool to complement my course. The game would likely only be played once during the course and therefore had to be high-impact and memorable; it had to be obviously relevant to students; and (unlike a 2 hour lecture on literature reviews) it had to be fun! read more

Multiplatform 2017

On the 21st June, the Games Research Network hosted its first annual symposium, Multiplatform 2017, in Manchester. We were joined by academics from universities across the UK, and beyond, to discuss research into games and gaming, in both the digital and analogue formats. The symposium began with a Key Note address from Professor Paul Booth, who joined us from DePaul University, Chicago, and included presentations on the lack of research into modern tabletop games, the role of games as a paratext, and a consideration of the ethics of gameplay. read more

How to REALLY Win at Gloom: an Interview with Keith Baker

In a recent session, members of the Games Research Network met up to play Gloom, a card game designed and created by Keith Baker and distributed by Atlas Games. Following the game, we put some questions to Keith, which he very kindly agreed to answer, and which we share here for your reading pleasure. read more

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