Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

Author: gamesresearchnetwork (page 1 of 11)

It’s the End of the World as We Know It

Earlier this year the Games Research Network asked if I could write a brief blog post introducing my research. Cue various conferences, college projects, impending deadlines, a series of viral infections and a fair amount of procrastination, and we’re finally here, my first ever blog post.

Before you a city lies in ruins. Buildings burn whilst flaming meteors fall from the heavens. Gathered on a roof-top, viewing the devastation, our heroes are addressed by their leader… read more

MIGRATIONS LARP AND THE VALUE OF PLAY

After our run at The Smoke in January, earlier this summer Dr Chloe Buckley and myself ran a small LARP workshop as part of the Manchester Gothic Festival, during the International Gothic Association Conference. This game was open to the public and offered participants the opportunity to experience a gothic-style narrative from the inside, as characters. Inspired by the world of HP Lovecraft’s novels and its surrounding mythos, Migrations aimed to introduce participants to the feeling of being trapped and suddenly ignorant of the basic rules of the world – a common enough experience for characters in Gothic novels. read more

CFP: ‘Analog Games and Translation’ (Analog Game Studies)

Special Issue of Analog Game Studies: ‘Analog Games and Translation’

Guest Editor: Jonathan Evans, University of Portsmouth, UK

Call for Papers

This special issue will analyse translation in and of modern analog games, including board games, card games, tabletop role-playing games (RPGs) and live action role-playing games (LARPs). Recent decades have seen the expansion of the hobby of gaming around the world and gaming is now more multinational and multilingual than ever. read more

Book Review: Horror Video Games edited by Bernard Perron

Horror Video Games: Essays on the Fusion of Fear and Play

Edited by Bernard Perron

McFarland & Co, 2009. ISBN 978-0786441976

As a fan of horror video games, the rush of being low on ammo in Resident Evil 2 is something that academic texts usually don’t live up to. However, Bernard Perron’s edited collection Horror Video Games: Essays on the Fusion of Fear and Play (2009) is about as close as it gets. Perron, the author of Silent Hill: The Terror Engine (2012) and The World of Scary Video Games (2018) as well as the co-editor of The Video Game Theory Reader (2003) and The Video Game Theory Reader 2 (2009), weaves together both academic and industry voices into the first horror reader for Game Studies. We’re fortunate that the first, and as of this writing only, game in town is a real horrorshow. read more

Undergraduate Scholarship: Magic the Gathering

In the academic year 2017-18, our Faculty of Arts and Humanities at Manchester Metropolitan University launched a number of Undergraduate Scholarships. These Scholarships were designed to support research within our faculty by providing funding to second-year students to act as research assistants to members of academic staff. The funding would be for a period of five weeks over the summer, and would therefore be ideal for research projects that would benefit from an intense fixed-term engagement. I am the academic researcher for one of these Undergraduate Scholarships, and I am using the support to look at world-building in Magic the Gathering. read more

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