Games Research Network

Researching analogue and digital games

Unhappy Families: using tabletop games as a technology to understand play in education

Research in Learning Technology has just published an open-access paper by Sam Illingworth, Paul Wake and me on the use of tabletop games as a learning technology. You can find it here.

In our article, we use Keith Baker’s Gloom to explore the nature of games and play in education, comparing the physical, collaborative and adaptable aspects of tabletop games to their digital counterparts, and arguing that tabletop games should be considered as a complementary technology to digital games. read more

Inspiring Through Games

The work of three Games Research Network members was recently published in the April edition of Physics World and today online. The training, delivered by Sam Illingworth and Paul Wake, and coordinated by Hannah Renshall from the Institute of Physics, aimed to empower non-scientist community leaders already working with audiences under-represented in physics to engage them with aspirational STEM activities. read more

4th Games Degrees End of Year Showcase

Saturday 21st April, 11:00 – 15:00. John Dalton C0.17, C0.13a and C0.13b

Following another fantastic Games Degrees showcase last year, the School of Computing, Mathematics and Digital Technology will again be hosting an End of Year Showcase for our Games Degrees!  We would love for you to come along and to bring your friends and family – the event is open to all! read more

New Catan Scenario

Followers of the Games Research Network will be aware that we have been working on an (unofficial) expansion for Klaus Teuber’s seminal tabletop game Catan®. The scenario aims to develop dialogue around global warming, and it is now available for download.

Follow this link to download the game read more

‘Eat Who I Eat’: Assassin’s Creed Discovery Tour

Assassin's Creed Origins

I am a (not uncritical) fan of historical murder-simulation franchise Assassin’s Creed, and I’ve played pretty much every major entry in the series since it began, often gritting my teeth at the bad plot and violence to explore the worlds of Renaissance Italy, Victorian London and Revolutionary Paris. I’m also an educationalist and former history teacher, so when Assassin’s Creed Discovery Tour: Ancient Egypt was announced I was intrigued by the concept of learning history through playing what is usually a blockbuster game. The first thing that came into my head was this joke from the classic Simpsons episode ‘Marge vs The Monorail’, when Springfield Elementary School’s budget looks to be getting a huge boost: read more

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